How to Store Tea

The Six Immutable Laws of Tea Storage

Storing tea can be very simple. If you keep your tea in an airtight container and then store your container in a dark, cool, dry place free from strong odors, you will likely consume it before you begin to notice any degradation in aroma or taste. Looking a bit deeper into tea storage opens up a bit more complexity and in this article, I break it down for you. When we talk about a tea deteriorating, what do we mean? Mostly oxidation. For teas that are prevented from oxidizing during production (see tea processing chart here), or that are not
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Golden_Gate_Bridge,_San_Francisco_and_Sutro_Tower

Guide to Tea in the Bay Area

Since I recently moved to the Bay Area (for a job in tea), it’s only appropriate that I post a guide to the area’s rich tea culture. You may not be aware, but the Bay Area is a hotbed of tea culture, nowhere else in the states can seem to support such a slew of high-end tea shops. What set the stage for such a great tea-scene? Well nearly a quarter of people in the Bay Area are of Asian descent and in the 1990s, David Lee Hoffman and Roy Fong began importing Chinese teas, the likes of which Americans
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Wedding Tea

How We Used Tea in Our Wedding Ceremony

Because tea is what brought Katie and I together, we thought we’d use it in our wedding ceremony. Let me explain first how tea brought us together because some people seem to think this kind of thing just doesn’t happen. Geoffrey Norman aka “Lazy Literatus” has a “standing ‘scientific’ theory that tea and dating don’t blend.” I asked him what he thought of our relationship and he said that it “seems to exist in stubborn defiance of my theory” and that Katie and I must have “sold our souls to Guan Yin… or something equally plausible.” All joking aside, Katie was working
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Engineer's Guide to Tea

The Engineer’s Guide to Tea Preparation

The bulk of tea produced in the world is commodity tea, meaning that it is actively traded and it’s price is determined by the markets. Commodity tea is relatively cheap, with the worldwide average price of commodity black tea typically in the area of $2.85USD/kilogram. Many of the world’s famous tea cultures1 are famous because they are promulgated by common man and are thus largely based on cheap commodity tea. There is however, a larger amount of high quality tea being produced every year, what some are calling the specialty tea industry. One way to think about the difference between commodity
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Post-Fermented Tea Classification

Post-fermented Teas China Hunan Heicha 湖南 黑茶 (Anhua) Fu Zhuan 茯砖  “fu brick” Qian Liang Cha 千两茶 “thousand tael tea” (sometimes called Hua Juan) Bai Liang Cha 百两茶 “hundred tael tea” Shi Liang Cha 十两茶 “ten tael tea” Hua Zhuan 花砖 “flower brick” Hei Zhuan 黑砖茶 “dark brick” Xiang Jian 湘尖 “hunan tips” Tian Jian 天尖 “sky tips” Gong Jian 贡尖 “tribute tips” Sheng Jian 生尖 “raw tips” Qu Jiangbo Pian 渠江薄片 (coin shaped) Sichuan Heicha 四川 黑茶 Nan Lu Bian Cha 南路边茶 “south border tea” Xi Lu Bian Cha 西路边茶 “west border tea” Kang Zhuan 康砖 “kang brick” literally “peaceful brick”
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tea-processing

Übersicht Teeverarbeitung

A German translation of my original tea processing chart. The original processing chart can be found here. German translation courtesy of Thomas Kasper of SiamTeas. Thomas Kasper is known for sourcing pure teas from Thailand. Download a high resolution versions of the chart: [PDF] [JPEG]
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tea-processing

Gráfico de los procesos del té

Gracias a Fernando Enrique Padín Sáez de España por proporcionarme esta traducción al español del gráfico de los procesos del té. Original here. Descargar gráfico de los procesos del té: [PDF] [JPEG] Gráfico de los procesos del té by Tony Gebely is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. Based on a work at worldoftea.org.
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Romanization of Tea Terms

Romanization of Tea Terms

Surprisingly little is understood within the tea industry when it comes to the romanization of tea terms. This to me is troubling because confused tea vendors result in confused tea consumers. Because the Chinese have contributed the bulk of tea knowledge to the world, much of the romanization issues surround Modern Standard Chinese, though I’ll touch on Korean and Japanese as well. Romanization refers to the transliteration of any writing system to the Roman alphabet. It is important to understand the difference between transliteration and translation. Transliteration tells us how to say the other language’s word in our own language. Translation gives
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Hwang Cha (Balhyocha)

South Korean Balhyocha & Hwangcha

I recently went down the rabbit hole as they say researching a single topic for my upcoming book on tea. This time the rabbit hole was related to South Korean tea: balhyocha and hwangcha to be exact. Some tea merchants selling the same product will call it hwangcha and some will call it balhyocha. There seems to be no single definition of either of these tea terms and even more disconcerting, neither fits cleanly into standard tea classifications. What follows are excerpts from Matt of the wonderful Mattcha tea blog and discussions I’ve had with two South Korean tea experts followed by my own take
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Tea Types and Tea Styles

A New Look at Tea Classification

Throughout history, tea has been categorized many ways: by the color of the finished leaves, by the color of the tea liquor, and by the percentage of oxidation the tea leaves have gone through during processing. The goal of categorizing tea is to provide a clear foundation for education by lumping together teas with similar qualities. Each of the above classification methods fall short of providing a method of classification by which all tea styles can be categorized. Classifying teas by the processing methods that created them however, allows us to achieve this goal as tea styles can easily be lumped
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