Tea and Gender

There have been no polls or studies in the United States that I’ve seen that reveal the demographics of tea drinkers in the country. But evidence is suggesting that the bulk of tea-drinkers fall in the 18-35 year old male category. A growing group of men drawn by the history and culture behind the drink. “‘The vast majority of Asian tea masters are men, and in fact, the tea industry itself is known as a “gentleman’s” business. Women might drink much of the tea in the western world, but men are usually the ones buying and selling it in the
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Chicago Tea Writers Confab

Over the weekend, I had the pleasure of meeting with Steve Knoerr [http://39steeps.blogspot.com/] and Lainie Petersen [http://www.lainiesips.com/]. We spent most of the day drinking our favorite teas and talking about the current state of the world of tea. This is what its all about folks — community, friendship. Tea brings people together. Make sure you hop on over to Steve’s blog and check out his post chronicalling the event: http://39steeps.blogspot.com/2009/08/chicago-tea-writers.html If you also live in the Chicago area and would like to participate in one of these meetups, let us know: http://twitter.com/WorldofTea
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Tea Pig's Name and Shame Campaign

I don’t usually like to tout tea companies, and I’ve never even tried tea from this company but “Tea Pigs” in the UK has begun their “Name and Shame” campaign. They have a form on their website called “Name and Shame a Purveyor of  Slop” where a customer can “shame” a cafe or tea shop that is serving terrible tea. Not only is this hilarious, but it is an awesome way to promote tea education — because these claims will undoubtedly raise the question: “What makes the tea bad?” From Caterersearch: The company wants 2009 to be a ‘year of
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Interview: Yunnan Sourcing's Scott Wilson

Scott Wilson is an American who settled in Kunming China and founded the tea export company Yunnan Sourcing. He spends his days working on the floor of one of the largest Pu-erh trading centers of the world. How did you come to love tea? It all started with Yunnan. I traveled for about 5 months in Yunnan province in 1998-1999. At that time I started to drink Pu-erh and other Yunnan teas. I had this idea that I would try and introduce it people in the USA. I purchased and shipped back more than 80 kilograms of Pu-erh tea at
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Welcome to the inaugural Tea Tuesday

From the mind of http://twitter.com/siptea I present to you the latest “Twitter Day”: #teatuesday and #teatimetuesday What will you drink today? The Original Tea Time Tuesday: http://twitter.com/teatimetuesday Tuesday is the day to tweet #tea! Feel free to join in. Also, don’t forget to follow World of Tea!
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The Adventure of Finding Great Tea

To me, finding a great tea is an adventure. I can’t always wander around the hills of Asia searching out tiny tea gardens, or wander the streets of Chongqing looking for that tiny tea shop that no tourist has ever set foot in. Because I cannot always do these things, I’ll go to great lengths to find little-known teas, to discover something that not many in the Western world has tried. Some of my great finds have been on EBay and Twitter. I stumbled across Yunnan Sourcing a few years ago on Ebay, run by an American Expat — Scott
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The Origins of the Gong Fu Tea Ceremony

In pinyin, the term “Kung Fu” is written: gōngfu. The term really has nothing to do with martial arts, but refers to the possession of great skill. So in the world of tea, when we refer to the gong fu tea cermony, we are referring to a skillful way to prepare tea. When performing the gongfu tea ceremony there is no formal set of rules, procedures, or utensils — but there are some fundamental ideas that have grown into the tradition we now call the Gong Fu Tea Ceremony. The first treatise on tea surfaced during the 8th century –
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The redundancy of "Chai Tea" (Masala Chai)

We’ve all said it, “chai tea” — the greatest redundancy in the world of tea. In the Hindi language, “chai” means “tea”, so saying “chai tea” is the same as saying “tea tea.” Just think about that the next time you are in a coffeeshop and hear someone order a “chai tea latte” — whatever that is. Granted the popularized form of “chai tea” in America is syrup or powder based anyway – so calling what most drink in America “masala chai” would be a bastardization.  Masala refers to a mixture of spices; in masala chai, usually cardamom, cinnamon, cloves,
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