State of the tea industry 2010…

There have been many changes in our industry of late, and as it grows — we must be sure to be mindful of our actions as consumers in this growing industry — demanding only the best, honest, fair goods. A store can only sell things if we buy them. The power is in our hands, especially as this industry takes off. Let me start by introducing three societal “movements” from where many of my ideas and opinions are sourced: 1. Slow Food 2. Free Knowledge 3. The end of mass-marketing The slow food movement was started 20 years ago and
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India372

Want a job in the tea industry? Move to India.

Update: Here is a great resource for India tea related jobs http://www.indianteahelp.com/ This informative article from DNA India has some interesting insight to tea industry jobs in India … see the full post here: “There are a variety of jobs one can specialise in, within the tea industry. Tea tasting is one of the highly specialised areas of work. Research, plantation management, tea brokerage and consultancy are some of the other areas which can be specialized. One can work as a factory manager. The work involves supervision of all plantation work right from planting, plucking, processing to packing and transport
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A month off, a new year.

Its been a little under a month since I’ve written an article. But we all need a bit of a break here and there. It was a wonderful 2009 and I’m excited as the tea industry continues to blossom in America — to see what it brings. More and more of my close friends have been getting into tea, its very exciting to hear how they started, what teas they like, and where they are getting their tea from. This year I’m going to try to be more conscious of where the tea I buy comes from. I guess you
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Mauna Kea's Sweet Roast Green Tea

I have tried some great new teas out of Hawaii. It is really exciting to be able to try something so new. I received this package of “Sweet Roast Green Tea” from Mauna Kea. The leaves looked like no other tea leaves I had ever seen. Almost appearing as if they had been plucked, baked, then coarsely shopped. They were flat and jagged. The instructions on the bag said that this was meant to be an iced tea. “Brew 1/4 cup of tea in 2 litres boiling water for 2 min. Strain. Enjoy Chilled.” Now 1/4 cup of leaves —
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Tea is the new… Money?

via BBC [http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/north_yorkshire/8428824.stm]: Motorway thieves steal tea bags in Yorkshire Thieves have stolen 11 pallets containing tea from a lorry parked in a lay-by on the A1 in North Yorkshire. The tea was taken on Monday night as the lorry was parked by the southbound carriageway near RAF Leeming. Officers said that despite the lorry being locked thieves cut its side curtain and took the pallets. They contained Tetley Tea products including Red Bush and Green Tea. North Yorkshire Police have appealed for witnesses to come forward.
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Christmas Tree Tea

You’re right, its not really tea. There’s no tea included. I found this curious product at the Ferry Building’s Saturday Farmers Market in San Francisco a few weeks ago. What you get for around $7.00 is 20 tea-bags filled with douglas fir tips. From the box: “this tea [tea? really?] is made with hand-gathered, sustainably-wild-harvested Douglas Fir Tips. Although nothing that comes from the wild can be certified organic, since this term applies only to farm-grown produce, our Douglas Fir is harvested in pristine wilderness that has never seen any chemicals and is probably more natural than the most organic
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The Gong Fu Cha Institute at Penn State

I had a chance to speak with Jason Cohen, president of Penn State’s new “Gong Fu Cha” institute. The institute aims to: “build a tea library in order to document the vintages of tea and to propagate through instruction the art of GongFu Cha.” If you go to Penn State, you can join the institute every Wednesday from 6-9 in the HUB-Robeson Center. I asked Jason a series of questions… here we go: What got you started in tea? I got started in tea in the summer of 2007. I was in China for about 2 months, during which I
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Review: Lu Shan Yun Wu from Dream About Tea

I’ve been itching to get my hands on some of this green tea for some time, and Lainie Petersen just happened to give me a bit: This tea looks awesome, its tiny and wiry leaves steeped up a beautiful light-green liquor that had a very subtle taste with no astringency whatsoever! I definitely recommend this tea for a simple green tea if astringency is not your thing. Dream About Tea’s site says: “This is a rare and unusual Chinese green tea, grown in Lu Shan, Jiangxi, China. The dry leaf is dark green, small, and twisted, and infuses to a
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What is a HOB? And how does it keep my tea warm?

I received a curious package in the mail last week. It contained “hobs” from Thistledown.com. What is a “hob” you ask? Their site defines hobs as: “a shelf in the back of a fireplace on which to place things to keep warm”; and “hob” is a British colloquialism for a stove top.” Thistledow’s hobs are not shelves in the back of fireplaces, rather — they are cozies for your tea. Not one of those old-lady Victorian style cozies either. It looks cool. They have all sorts of designs on the site. But, the big question… do they work, and if
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