mint growing in chicago

DIY: Moroccan Mint Tea

The everyday tea served in Morocco consists of gunpowder green tea, fresh mint, and copious amounts of sugar. The mint growing in my yard in Chicago: Giving the mint a rinse: The pot is stuffed with mint and about 2 teaspoons of gunpowder green tea, now I’m adding 1/4 cup of raw sugar. You can find cheap gunpowder green tea at most Asian grocers. It usually comes in dark green boxes:    
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Pakistanis facing sugar shortage: putting candy in tea [via: Reuters]

Due to a bad sugarcane crop, Pakistan is facing a massive sugar shortage. As tea is a daily staple in Pakistani life, tea with large amounts of sugar, the people of Pakistan have resorted to adding candies to their tea to sweeten it: “As Pakistanis face an acute shortage of sugar, some families have found an easily available alternative to sweeten their tea: instead of a spoonful of sugar, they dissolve sweets in their tea.” Read the whole story at Reuters.com.
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An Authentic Milk Oolong

Nai Xiang, literally “milk fragrance” is a Taiwanese high-mountain oolong made with the Jin Xuan cultivar of camellia sinensis. It is known not only for it’s milk-like mouth-feel, but also for it’s cream like flavor and aroma. Many so-called “milk oolongs” have popped up on the market having been artificially flavored. In 2010, Roy Fong, owner of the Imperial Tea Court traveled to Taiwan and  discovered several variants of it’s production. From what he discovered, I am seeing three different things all being called “milk oolong” in order of legitimacy: True Jin Xuan oolong with natural creamy mouth-feel. Jin Xuan grown with a
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They Only Make It Because We Buy It – Part One

“Brand X’s Tie Guan Yin Oolong” — Have you ever asked yourself what did “Brand X” do to make that oolong their own? What differentiates this tea from Brand Y’s Tie Guan Yin Oolong? We first must assume that they even purchased the tea from different sources. I challenge you to question every tea purchase you make, to look into the history of that tea, to inquire about where it came from, when it was harvested, who it was harvested by. Moving along… The way things used to be in America — are the way things still are in many
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Eight cups of tea a day good for heart, brain [via: Times of India]

Health experts in claim that drinking eight cups of tea daily can be good for you, claiming: “Caffeinated drinks have been unfairly demonised. Black tea, in particular, contains polyphenols, which are natural plant antioxidants. These have beneficial effects on many biochemical processes in the body because they protect cells against harmful free radicals. Flavonoids are thought to be especially useful, with a number of studies reporting a link between them and lower risk of heart attack.” This mostly applies to black tea, having more caffeine and thus — masala tea — which is a principle beverage in India. Read more:
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Kenyan Tea Prices at Record High

Reuters reported this week that Kenyan tea prices were at a record high, mostly from concerns that the next harvest will be bad due to foretasted bad weather. Read the full report here [http://af.reuters.com/article/investingNews/idAFJOE59I0R720091019].
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