Review: Roy Fong's Great Teas of China

I had a chance to read an advance copy of Roy Fong’s “Great Teas of China” — a book where Roy (of Imperial Teas) takes us on his lifetime tea journey as he rediscovers tea in Hong Kong and travels China to find the best teas. He discusses ten of his favorite teas in the book and explains the stories behind them and the processing methods involved. The book is a great insight to Chinese teas as there is still a lot of information that has never been translated to English on the subject. Roy also realizes the breadth of
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Give the gift of Matcha: Matcha Source's Matcha Kits

Do you have a tea-lover in your life and don’t have a clue what to get them for the holidays? Have they tried matcha? Matchasource.com offers several matcha kits for a low-cost foray into the world of high-quality matcha. You get everything you need to start drinking one of the healthiest teas on the planet. For $69.00, you get: a 30 gram tin of Morning Matcha Classic Grade Organic Matcha, a 100 prong bamboo whisk for frothing tea, a stainless sifter (to rid the matcha of clumps and provide for a smoother brew), a bamboo tea scoop, a ceramic matcha
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This Week in News: Tea and Your Health

In the past week, I have seen more news reports claiming health benefits of tea than ever before. I wanted to share with you some of the more interesting ones: November 20: Brewed Tea Loaded with Health Benefits http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/lifestyle/health_and_environment/x1945261872/Brewed-tea-loaded-with-health-benefits “Chinese tea increases antioxidants; boosts metabolism; regulates female emotion; cleanses kidneys and bladder; regulates gastrointestinal system; lowers cholesterol; burns calories; [and] soothes [the] nervous system.” November 23: Green Tea Eases Stress and Fatigue from Overworking http://www.naturalnews.com/027553_green_tea_stress_reduction.html “Those who drank five cups of green tea per day showed considerably less psychological distress than those who drank less than a cup a day.
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How a Water Boiler Changed My Life

I recently made a rather large tea purchase, I bought a $170 water boiler. This may sound like a lot of money, but I am completely in love with the purchase. I bought a Zojirushi CV-DSC40 VE Hybrid Water Boiler. Let me tell you why it is awesome: My Tea Brewing system: – All water used for tea is treated with bamboo charcoal. I simply pour water into a gallon pitcher with several pieces of bamboo charcoal in it. Once my water boiler is empty, the bamboo charcoal water is then poured into the Zojirushi. – The Zojirushi heats the
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mint growing in chicago

DIY: Moroccan Mint Tea

The everyday tea served in Morocco consists of gunpowder green tea, fresh mint, and copious amounts of sugar. The mint growing in my yard in Chicago: Giving the mint a rinse: The pot is stuffed with mint and about 2 teaspoons of gunpowder green tea, now I’m adding 1/4 cup of raw sugar. You can find cheap gunpowder green tea at most Asian grocers. It usually comes in dark green boxes:    
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Pakistanis facing sugar shortage: putting candy in tea [via: Reuters]

Due to a bad sugarcane crop, Pakistan is facing a massive sugar shortage. As tea is a daily staple in Pakistani life, tea with large amounts of sugar, the people of Pakistan have resorted to adding candies to their tea to sweeten it: “As Pakistanis face an acute shortage of sugar, some families have found an easily available alternative to sweeten their tea: instead of a spoonful of sugar, they dissolve sweets in their tea.” Read the whole story at Reuters.com.
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An Authentic Milk Oolong

Nai Xiang, literally “milk fragrance” is a Taiwanese high-mountain oolong made with the Jin Xuan cultivar of camellia sinensis. It is known not only for it’s milk-like mouth-feel, but also for it’s cream like flavor and aroma. Many so-called “milk oolongs” have popped up on the market having been artificially flavored. In 2010, Roy Fong, owner of the Imperial Tea Court traveled to Taiwan and  discovered several variants of it’s production. From what he discovered, I am seeing three different things all being called “milk oolong” in order of legitimacy: True Jin Xuan oolong with natural creamy mouth-feel. Jin Xuan grown with a
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They Only Make It Because We Buy It – Part One

“Brand X’s Tie Guan Yin Oolong” — Have you ever asked yourself what did “Brand X” do to make that oolong their own? What differentiates this tea from Brand Y’s Tie Guan Yin Oolong? We first must assume that they even purchased the tea from different sources. I challenge you to question every tea purchase you make, to look into the history of that tea, to inquire about where it came from, when it was harvested, who it was harvested by. Moving along… The way things used to be in America — are the way things still are in many
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