tea-app-iphone

Tea for iPhone, an Interview with the Developer

I recently sat down with Samuel Iglesias, tea-enthusiast (nerd) and first-time iPhone developer to discuss his journey in creating an app called “Tea.” Who helped you with the app? Tea is the result of a collaboration between me (@siglesias) and designer Mac Tyler (@mactyler). I came up with the concept after being frustrated by my scattershot, do-whatever approach to making tea–sometimes it would taste great, other times not so much, and I would never be exact about how long I steeped it, just sort of let it sit there until my intuition told me it was ready. After learning that
Continue reading...

puerh_tuocha_sticky_rice

Nuo Mi Xiang “Sticky Rice” Pu-erh

There exists an herb in China’s Yunnan Province who’s aroma closely resembles that of sticky glutinous rice. “Nuo Mi Xiang Nen Ye” translates to “Sweet Rice Tender Leaves.” This tea in maocha form, is left for months in close contact with Nuo Mi Xiang Nen Ye leaves until the tea leaves take on the scent of the herb. The leaves are pressed into tiny tuochas, which Wikipedia states is “believed to have originated from the round, top-like shape of the pressed tea or from the old tea shipping and trading route of the Tuojiang River.” The shape resembles tiny birds-nests, and they
Continue reading...

mzl.ijsywcov.320x480-75

Tea for iPhone Now Available

iPhone Developer Sam Iglesias (@siglesias) announced today that Tea for iPhone (@teaapp) has been released in Appleʼs iTunes App Store. Tea for iPhone is a new iOS application that gives tea drinkers a convenient way to store their tasting notes and brew settings, with simple one-tap sharing for Facebook and Twitter. Tea also has a built in timer that remembers settings for all inputted teas as well as an Inventory Tracker that automatically calculates how many brews are remaining of each tea. Tea also recognizes over 700 tea names and 15 tea types to provide temperature and steep time suggestions. “The idea for Tea came a while
Continue reading...

seek-truth

The Importance of Doing Research for Your Customers

So many times I meet people that have been told erroneous information about tea. I have met countless people searching for certain teas that will cure certain disorders, from sleep apnea to arthritis. I drink tea because it tastes good, tea is not a medicine to me, and I don’t believe in selling tea as a “medicine.” I believe it is a deceptive practice, and one that many are susceptible to, If you knew nothing about tea and someone told you that it would help you lose weight, you would probably believe them, right? Examples of Bad Information [blackbirdpie url="http://twitter.com/TeaBenefitsCom/status/42229795894988800"] [blackbirdpie url="http://twitter.com/CraigBaylor/status/44505534375788544"]
Continue reading...

From  Wonderlane's Flickr

Theanine: a 4000 Year Old Mind-Hack

Monks have been drinking tea for thousands of years to maintain a state of “mindful alertness” during long periods of meditation. But only in the last few years have studies shed light on why tea has this effect on the mind. The two elements responsible for this are caffeine and L-theanine, and it is the combination of the two that makes tea unique from any other drink. Spare Me the Science: What L-theanine and Caffeine can do for the Mind Promote a mindful state of relaxation Increase our ability to multi-task, and multi-task well Increase speed of perception Increase performance
Continue reading...

Hacker Monthly Magazine: Guide to Tea

Just wanted to share with everyone a beautiful PDF of my previous “Hacker’s Guide to Tea” that will appear in the January 2011 issue of Hacker Monthly. Hacker Monthly is a collection of the most interesting posts from Hacker News each month. Here it is, enjoy!: Hacker’s Guide to Tea
Continue reading...

IMG_5352

Pu-erh Flower Beencha

I’m not even sure what to call this. This is a beencha of pressed camellia sinensis flowers! Opening the wrapper I was greeted by an amazingly fresh, flowery fragrance. When steeped, the flowers basically re-blossom and release a sweet, slightly pungent and nutty liquor. Not sure how to steep this tea, I did a 1:30 infusion @ 195F and it was delicious.
Continue reading...

Online Tea Communities

Just wanted to share a bunch of tea communities with you that I’ve been following over the years: Badger and Blade Forums http://badgerandblade.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=90 Leafbox Tea Forums: http://leafboxtea.com/forum Tea Subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/tea/ Tea-Mail http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teamail/ Tea Advisor: http://teaadvisor.com/ Rec.Food.Drink.Tea: http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.drink.tea/topics Tea Chat: http://www.teachat.com/ Twitter: Using the hash-tag #tea http://search.twitter.com/search?q=%23tea Steepster: http://steepster.com/discuss
Continue reading...

James Norwood Pratt’s Tea Dictionary: Camellia

Camellia: Botanical genus to which the tea species and its varieties belong, named for Georg Josef Kamel, a German Jesuit missionary who lived in Japan during the latter half of the 1600s and classified the plants he found in Asia. The Camellia genus includes 81 different Camellia varieties besides tea, like the garden flower Camellia japonica. If you want to read more about James Norwood Pratt’s Tea Dictionary or to pick up  a copy, click here.
Continue reading...