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Pu-erh Flower Beencha

I’m not even sure what to call this. This is a beencha of pressed camellia sinensis flowers! Opening the wrapper I was greeted by an amazingly fresh, flowery fragrance. When steeped, the flowers basically re-blossom and release a sweet, slightly pungent and nutty liquor. Not sure how to steep this tea, I did a 1:30 infusion @ 195F and it was delicious.
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Online Tea Communities

Just wanted to share a bunch of tea communities with you that I’ve been following over the years: Badger and Blade Forums http://badgerandblade.com/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=90 Leafbox Tea Forums: http://leafboxtea.com/forum Tea Subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/tea/ Tea-Mail http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teamail/ Tea Advisor: http://teaadvisor.com/ Rec.Food.Drink.Tea: http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.drink.tea/topics Tea Chat: http://www.teachat.com/ Twitter: Using the hash-tag #tea http://search.twitter.com/search?q=%23tea Steepster: http://steepster.com/discuss
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James Norwood Pratt’s Tea Dictionary: Camellia

Camellia: Botanical genus to which the tea species and its varieties belong, named for Georg Josef Kamel, a German Jesuit missionary who lived in Japan during the latter half of the 1600s and classified the plants he found in Asia. The Camellia genus includes 81 different Camellia varieties besides tea, like the garden flower Camellia japonica. If you want to read more about James Norwood Pratt’s Tea Dictionary or to pick up  a copy, click here.
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Jame’s Norwood Pratt’s Tea Dictionary: Kamairi Cha

Kamairi Cha: Special Japan green sometimes called “China green tea” by the Japanese because it is pan-fired and not steamed. After a short withering, the leaf is fired in hot iron pans at 300C with constant agitation to prevent scorching. Rolling techniques employed during firing can produce either leaf pellets or flat leaf. Best Kamairicha comes from Saga Prefecture’s Ureshino district. Rarely Available in the west. If you want to read more about James Norwood Pratt’s Tea Dictionary or to pick up  a copy, click here. If you’d like to try Kamairi cha, we have some here.
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Brazil Green Tea

Tea from Brazil

I recently received a sample of shincha green tea from Stash Tea from Brazil. This is my first contact with Brazilian tea. Stash’s website says: “The Yamamotoyama Brazilian tea gardens are in two highland areas in the central part of the country at an elevation of 2,000-2,500 feet. The climate here is comparable to Japan and optimal for growing superlative green tea. In fact, tea bushes from Japan were carefully selected and transported to Brazil to plant in these gardens.” The leaves, like many Japanese teas are steamed and chopped and they emit a sweet, vegetal smell. I infused the
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Hacker’s Guide to Tea

TL;DR: All tea comes from the camellia sinensis plant. If you are drinking something that did not come from this plant (chamomile, mint, tulsi, rooibos, etc.) it is not tea. White, Green, Oolong, Yellow, Black and Pu-erh teas all come from the varieties and cultivars of the camellia sinensis plant and the type and style of tea is determined by the processing methods used on the plucked leaves. Tea contains L-theanine, an amino acid that promotes mental acuity. The combination of L-theanine and caffeine creates a sense of “mindful awareness.” Tea can be prepared in any vessel by steeping the
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Zisha Clay and Lead

Lead Testing a Cheap Yixing Pot

It is believed that some tea-ware coming from China may contain lead. Especially pots supposedly made of Zisha clay from Yixing, China. A few years back there was a thread in TeaChat about this, no one found any lead when using home test kits. I tried it with the cheapest “yixing” pot I could find (more about why this probably isn’t even a yixing pot in another post) online — $5.00. I smashed the pot with a hammer and then ground up the pieces until the pot was reduced to a pile of bits. I wanted to test the greatest
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Corey - Tiananmen

Tea Drinker Profile: Corey Cooper

Name: Corey Cooper Sex: Male Age: 29 Occupation: Education Consulting, tea sourcing, tea blogging Location: Beijing, China Do you drink tea at work?: I like to drink green tea or black tea at work, as proper gong fu brewing is not as essential to the experience.    Xi Hu Long Jing (西湖龙井) green tea as well as a nice Qimen Hong (祁门红) black tea are making it into my mug these days.  For a change of pace, I will brew some Dian Hong (滇红), a delicious black tea from Yunnan with a fragrant smell, orange and cinnamon notes. Interests: Tea
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cheerios

You Decide: Tea and Cancer

There’s been many opposing studies out there about tea and cancer right now. Many are claiming that tea can “prevent” cancer. Some actually say that tea can promote cancer. As always — when human health is involved, there is money to be made. Big brands are just waiting to tack a new label on a product touting the latest health benefits. Take Cheerios for example, if you were to look back at the history of cereal boxes they’ve used you would see messages ranging from “promotes a healthy heart” to “lowers your cholesterol” and “helps prevent cancer.” It seems that
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Drinking green tea doesn’t lower breast cancer risk [via: Consumer Reports]

clipped from blogs.consumerreports.org In the new study, researchers looked at data on nearly 54,000 middle-aged women in Japan. Over five years, the participants completed two detailed questionnaires asking about their health, lifestyle, and diet, including their consumption of green tea. The researchers then tracked who developed breast cancer. On average, the study followed the women for 13.6 years. The researchers found no difference in breast cancer risk based on how much green tea the women drank. Those who consumed five or more cups a day were just as likely to develop breast cancer as those who drank less than one
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